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Stock vs. Broth: Are You Confused?

Updated: May 3

One of the most common questions that those individuals embarking upon the GAPS Diet have is “Do I make stock or broth?” What is the difference between the two? The two words are often used interchangeably by the most educated of chefs.




Meat Stock
Meat stock, rather than bone broth, is used in the beginning stages of the GAPS Diet, especially during the Introduction Diet where the primary focus is healing the gut. Broth is ideal for consuming once gut healing has taken place. The significant difference is that the stock (meat stock) is not cooked as long as broth (bone stock). Stock is especially rich in gelatin and free amino acids, like proline and glycine. These amino acids, along with the gelatinous protein from the meat and connective tissue, are particularly beneficial in healing and strengthening connective tissue such as that found in the lining of the gut. These nutrients are pulled out of the meat and connective tissue during the first several hours of cooking meaty fish, poultry, beef and lamb. The larger the bones, the longer the recommended cooking time.

Bone Broth
Bone broth, the longer cooked bones without the meat, is a superior source for minerals, as well as the same amino acids found in meat stock. The amino acids (with the exception of histidine) are present in higher amounts in bone broth. For certain individuals with leaky membranes in the gut and brain, the high concentration of glutamic acid may be problematic. Some people, including autistic children, have impaired liver function that causes the accumulation of ammonia in the blood and brain. Liver disease-associated brain damage has been linked to the accumulation of ammonia. In recent years, studies have shown that excess glutamine aggravates this condition causing brain injury.


Gelatin
Gelatin, a major component of meat stock, also assists in the proper digestion of proteins ensuring optimal growth in infants and children. It improves the integrity of collagen, which is reflected in the improved appearance of the skin as well as in the lessening of digestive tract inflammation. Additionally, gelatin enhances the digestibility of grains and legumes cooked in it. Both grains and legumes are eliminated in the beginning of the GAPS Diet, with grains avoided completely until one is ready to transition off the GAPS Diet. Once gut healing is complete and the digestive tract function is restored, properly prepared grains and legumes will be best enjoyed prepared using meat stock or bone broth.

Preparation
In Gut and Psychology Syndrome Dr. Campbell-McBride explains how to prepare stock (meat stock) to be used during the GAPS Introduction Diet. Stock prepared in this way supports good digestion, as well as promotes proper secretion of hydrochloric acid, which is needed for breaking down proteins in the stomach. Lack of adequate hydrochloric acid can lead to a myriad of symptoms including acid reflux, skin disorders, anemia, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, vitiligo, asthma, food allergies and more.


Meat Stock Recipes
For those following the GAPS™ Intro Diet, do not include fibrous vegetables in meat stock recipes. This includes celery, broccoli and cauliflower. Do not use any potatoes during any stage of the GAPS™ Diet. When using squashes, remove skin and seeds.

Fish Stock
2 medium non-oily fish, such as sole or snapper 4 litres of purified water 1-2 medium yellow onions carrots bouquet garni (tie together using cooking twine): fresh bay leaf, fresh thyme, rosemary, sage peppercorns, handful Celtic Sea Salt, 1-2 teaspoons, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking parsley, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking

Rinse fish in purified water. Remove meat from the fish and reserve for cooking. Place bones, fins, tails, skin and heads in the pot. Add remaining ingredients. Fill pot with purified water. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1 to 1 ½ hours. Add parsley and salt during the last 10 minutes of cooking. Remove the fish bones and other large parts. Strain the stock.

Chicken, Pheasant or Turkey Stock
1 whole chicken, pheasant or turkey 4 litres of purified water 1-2 medium yellow onions 2-4 carrots) Celtic Sea Salt, 1-2 teaspoons to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking parsley, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking

Cut whole chicken in half down the middle lengthwise. Place these in the pot. Add remaining ingredients. Fill pot with purified water. Allow the pot and its contents to stand for 30 minutes, giving the raw apple cider vinegar time to draw minerals out of the bones. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1 ½ to 2 hours. Add parsley and salt during the last 10 minutes of cooking. Remove the chicken and other large parts. Debone and reserve the meat for eating. It will be delicious. Strain the stock.

Beef or Lamb Stock
4-5 pounds of bone marrow and knuckle bones 3 pounds of meaty ribs or neck bones 1 calf’s foot, if available, cut into pieces (optional) 4 litres of purified water 2 teaspoons Celtic sea salt 4 ounces raw apple cider vinegar 1-2 medium yellow onions 2-4 carrots 1 teaspoon dried peppercorns, fresh bay leaf, fresh thyme, rosemary, sage, peppercorns, handful Celtic Sea Salt, 1-2 teaspoons in the last 10 minutes of cooking parsley, to be added in the last 10 minutes of cooking.

Place the bones, meat and joints into a large pot. Add remaining ingredients. Fill pot with purified water. Allow pot and its contents to stand for 60 minutes, giving the raw apple cider vinegar time to draw minerals out of the bones. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 3 to 4 hours. Add parsley during the last 10 minutes of cooking. Debone and reserve the meat for eating. It will be delicious. Strain the stock.

Additional ingredients to consider for variety:
burdock root
chilies
cilantro
garlic
ginger
lemon grass
lemon rind
tamarind
Avoid adding starchy vegetables to your stock.




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